For many kids on the autism spectrum, oral motor tools have been a must have in his sensory arsenal.  Oral motor tools, like chewy tubes provide sensory input for our most active sensory seekers.  It took me a while to recognize my son’s sensory seeking for something other than chewing and drooling on everything.  I guess we figured the need would fade but periodically throughout the day, especially when he’s tired,  my son will start chewing on his fingers.  So instead of chewing his hands up we hand him an oral motor tool and voila! His chewing is transformed into a more acceptable modality.

The more socially acceptable form of oral motor tools.  I’ll post several options and brands.  These are great to send with kids to school so they are less obtrusive.

P’s and Q’s

Another great oral motor tool option that is fun and serves it’s purpose.  It might even help the user mind his or her p’s and q’s!

Our All Time Favorite: The Yellow Chewy Tube

The yellow chewy tube still has it’s time and place in our house.  It has the slimmest diameter of all the chewy tubes and doesn’t have knobs or other sensory stimulations


Yellow Chewy Tubes – $7.95

Retail Price: $17.95
You Save: $10.00
from: National Autism Resources Corp

Red Chewy Tube

The red chewy tube has a medium sized diameter.  Also good for oral motor stimulation.  If you’re concerned about diameters speak with an OT to determine the best size.


Red Chewy Tubes – $7.99

Retail Price: $17.99
You Save: $10.00
from: National Autism Resources Corp

Green Chewy Tube

This chewy tube has knobs on the outside to offer more sensory input.  Knobby or not depends on the users personal preference.


Green Chewy Tube (Textured) – $7.99

Retail Price: $17.99
You Save: $10.00
from: National Autism Resources Corp

Tri Chew

An easier grip, more areas to gnaw on, the tri chew is great for anyone needing oral motor stimulation


Tri-Chew XT – $5.99

Retail Price: $15.99
You Save: $10.00
from: National Autism Resources Corp

So Many Options

I only named a few of the options and brands out there just for developing the jaw and offering sensory input.  There are many other oral motor tools out there to improve muscle tone in the jaw (one example is the use of straws) or offer practice using the mouth appropriately (blowing bubbles, using whistles etc.)  To find other appropriate oral motor tools speak with a speech pathologist or an OT.  Both are knowledgeable and can offer wonderful suggestions tailored to your child’s individual needs.  One of my favorite speech therapy sites, where you can buy some of the above mentioned tools is Talk Tools.

As far as chewy tools go, there are many options available for children.  The options range from totally functional (and looking functional) to disguised tools that are more socially acceptable among older children. With so many options out there we can make sure our kids are happy, healthy and getting the sensory input they need.